Chicchirichi! (“kee-kee-REE-kee”) Or, cock-a-doodle-doo!

5-100

  1. Went to the Fish Market in Catania (see photos below).
  2. Bought bags of fresh produce:  tomatoes, figs, nectarines, limoni (no distinction between lemon or lime here), onions, basil, oil-cured olives, mortadella (a meat similar to bologna, but a bit more refined and with delicate flavor, our purchase was studded with pistacchio), ricotta salata.
  3. Ate my first fresh fico (fig) in Italia.
  4. G-chatted with my cousin Maddie, who is living in Prague.
  5. Watched “Il Postino” (great movie; slow and beautiful development).

“Chicchirichi!” says the rooster. “Miao,” says the cat. It is fun learning the animal sounds in Italian, even by necessity. We have a rooster. A block away from our hotel lives a rooster who crows every morning. And now, we have a kitten rooster – Panther. Yes, every morning, around 4:30am, Panther wakens us (and anyone else with ears) with his imitation rooster call. We’ve tried ignoring it (sorry neighbors) to no avail. Today is Italian Kitten Academy, Day 1; topic: “Il Miao.” We’ll cover the “hungry” miao, the “thirsty” miao, and the “ball play, please” miao. No more rooster crows!

 

And now, for some Fish Market pics…

Yes, that is a swordfish. She’s welcoming you to the market!

 

See that man in the black t-shirt? See the red guts he is swinging away from the swordfish? Yep, those were the innards.

 

Here’s something a little more appetizing, a smorgasbord of seafood – yummy!

 

Scooters, and sea urchins.

 

And, to finish things off, a lovely selection of shellfish.

 

I like the motion in this picture, it gives me a slightly woozy, disoriented feeling when I look at it. And, that’s sorta how I felt after walking through the market.

 

Ciao, bella!

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2 Comments

Filed under 5-100, Food. Cibo., Kitties

2 responses to “Chicchirichi! (“kee-kee-REE-kee”) Or, cock-a-doodle-doo!

  1. Lisa Berg

    Funny, that’s the same sound roosters make in Spanish! (Spelled differently, but that’s how it sounds!) My students always think the animal sounds are weird in Spanish, but then I get them to listen to what we say, and how it’s a bit difficult to put a word to a sound, and some come to realize that maybe it’s not all that “weird” after all…

  2. Pingback: Sigonella Directory | The Cinquecento Project

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